Trans people are FORCED TO DIVORCE in 19 European countriesAccess All Areas! Campaign Calls for Quick, Transparent, and Accessible Legal Gender Recognition

 

TGEU’s Access All Areas! campaign calls attention to the fact that identification documents that reflect one’s correct gender are elementary for everyone. For many trans people, the incorrect gendered information in their passport, ID card and other official documents is a constant source of discomfort and trouble. Having to present these documents – for example when travelling, opening a bank account or picking up a parcel – can mean being forced to come out as trans, even in situations that can spark humiliation, discrimination and violence.

73% of trans respondents to an EU-wide survey therefore expressed that easier gender recognition procedures would allow them to live more comfortably. However, 34 countries in Europe still do not allow for the recognition of a trans person’s gender identity without invasive and abusive requirements that violate human rights, such as forced sterilisation, divorce and diagnosis of mental illness.

TGEU’s Access All Areas! campaign on legal gender recognition therefore calls upon European governments to introduce quick, transparent and accessible gender recognition legislation as a measure to prevent discrimination against trans people and to protect their human rights.

 
Trans people in 23 countries have no other option but STERILISATION

Trans people face DISCRIMINATION when seeking employment

BULLYING AND HARASSMENT cause young trans people to drop out of school early

 

Download the Campaign Materials

English:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
- Logos
- Thumbnails
Albanian:
- Posters
- Factsheet
Dutch:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Finnish:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
French:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
German:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Greek:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Hungarian:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Italian:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Lithuanian:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Polish:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Russian:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Slovak:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Slovenian:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Spanish:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet
Turkish:
- Posters
- Postcards
- Factsheet

 

Campaign Factsheet “Legal Gender Recognition”

A short overview of what Legal Gender Recognition is, why it is important and what common problematic aspects are.

Factsheet Legal Gender Recognition

 

Toolkit “Legal Gender Recognition in Europe”

Facts, legal standards and background materials on European standards for changing name and gender identifiers, including the legal gender recognition checklist, myth busters and best practice legislation. For activists and policy makers.

Toolkit Legal Gender Recognition in Europe

Download the Toolkit “Legal Gender Recognition in Europe” 

 

Checklist Legal Gender Recognition

This checklist aims to assist in assessing the human rights compatibility of legal texts or proposals regulating gender recognition procedures. It lists the minimum standards on the commonly known issues in procedures, requirements or effects of gender recognition procedures.

How to use the check list: Go through the three different sections and compare whether the legal text complies with the criteria given below. If a question cannot be answered positively, or if the text does not address the mentioned criteria or is ill-defined, the text should be reviewed and brought into line.

Checklist_LGR

Download the Checklist “Legal Gender Recognition”

 

Gender Recognition Legislation Resources

Find examples of laws, proposals and court decisions regarding legal gender recognition here.

 

Translation

If you want to translate and adapt this campaign to your domestic context, write an email to noah@tgeu.org.

 

Disclaimer

This project has been produced with the financial support from the Open Society Foundation, the Dutch Government and the PROGRESS Programme of the European Union. The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of the author, and can in no way be taken to reflect the views of the European Commission, the Open Society Foundation or the Dutch Government.

Open Society Foundations

Dutch Ministry of Education Culture and ScienceEuropean Commission