Posted on 26. May 2016 in Depathologisation

The “Gender Incongruence of Childhood” diagnosis revisited: A statement from clinicians and researchers

2016 May 07

This is an open letter to the World Health Organization (WHO), an agency of the United Nations, from researchers and clinicians working in trans health and rights regarding proposed revisions to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Version 11 (ICD-11) that relate to healthcare for trans adults and adolescents, as well as gender diverse (GD) children.

We commend WHO for proposed revisions that would move diagnostic categories related to gender transition processes (currently ICD-10’s “F64 Gender identity disorders”) from the chapter of Mental and Behavioural Disorders to a new chapter on Conditions Related to Sexual Health. We also welcome the proposal to eliminate “F65.1. Fetishistic transvestism” and “F66. Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation” from the ICD-11 altogether. However, we are concerned about the proposed Gender Incongruence of Childhood (GIC) diagnosis and call on the WHO to reconsider its inclusion. Instead, we urge consideration of less stigmatizing proposals by the GATE Civil Society Expert Working Group and other global experts to facilitate access to psychological support for gender diverse children.

To add your name and voice to this letter, please fill out the form availabe at the bottom of this page: www.gicrevisited.org. You will be prompted to view other signatories after you submit your response, or follow the link in the signature section. For questions about this open letter, please write Sam Winter <sjwinter@hku.hk>. For questions about this web form, contact Kelley Winters <kelley@wintersgap.net>.

 

General comments on ICD proposals related to gender expression and identity

  1. We follow with interest the progress of the ICD revision process. We look forward to seeing the publication of ICD-11, which we are confident will remain, like ICD-10 (http://goo.gl/MlUnk8), the major diagnostic manual used worldwide.
  2. From the ICD-11 Beta Draft (http://goo.gl/tOhj9R) current at time of writing we note a number of revisions relevant to the provision of healthcare for transgender people, defined here as those individuals who identify in a gender other than the one that matches their sex assigned at birth.
  3. We support the proposal to abandon the diagnoses of fetishistic transvestism (F65.1) and all diagnoses in the block entitled disorders of sexual preference (Block F66). [Erratum 20150516. Should read, “Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation (Block F66).”] We agree that these diagnoses are problematic, in that they have no clinical utility, serve no credible public health need, reinforce defamatory stereotypes, and are potentially harmful to the health and wellbeing of those diagnosed.
  4. We support the proposal to remove from the Mental and Behavioural Disorders chapter the diagnoses most commonly used to facilitate gender affirming healthcare for transgender people, and to locate them instead in a chapter called Conditions Related to Sexual Health.
  5. We believe the proposal for a new chapter placement is in line with contemporary clinical understanding, affirmed by professional associations such as WPATH (the World Professional Association for Transgender Health, http://goo.gl/89zAwa), that the gender identities of transgender people are not properly viewed as psychopathological. We note that the psychopathologising perspective does not match (and has in fact sometimes undermined) the provision of effective gender affirming healthcare approaches used in contemporary times to support transgender people who have healthcare needs. Indeed it has contributed to potentially harmful approaches aimed at modifying their gender identities. The WPATH Standards of Care Version 7 (http://goo.gl/rven2O) note that such approaches are unethical. We believe too that the psychopathologising perspective has needlessly increased the stigma faced by transgender people, undermining the right to legal gender recognition.
  6. We support the abandonment of the term gender identity disorder, currently used as an overarching name for the block of diagnoses (F64) most commonly used to facilitate gender affirming healthcare for transgender people. We see the proposed replacement term, gender incongruence, as an attempt to reduce the overly pathologising language inherent in the term gender identity disorder. We note however that the term gender incongruence is not universally supported within transgender communities. See recent press releases by STP (International Campaign Stop Trans Pathologization, http://goo.gl/0GRvA6), and GATE (Global Action for Trans* Equality, http://goo.gl/GHpzog), the latter in association with STP.
  7. We note that there are currently two proposed gender incongruence diagnoses, one for adolescents/ adults, and one for children under the age of puberty. We note with approval language in the descriptions of these diagnoses which avoids binary thinking, and is more inclusive of the diversity in people’s gender identities.
  8. We note that other aspects of the wording of the diagnostic descriptions have attracted criticism. However we focus in the following sections on the proposal for a gender incongruence of childhood (GIC) diagnosis.

 

Specific concerns about the proposed gender incongruence of childhood diagnosis

  1. First, we note with concern that, regardless of where in ICD-11 the proposed GIC diagnosis is placed, it pathologises the experiences of young children below the age of puberty who are either exploring their identity, or are incorporating their gender identity into a broader sense of who they are, becoming comfortable expressing that identity, and managing any adverse reactions from others. We note that in a number of cultures worldwide these experiences, which we call here gender diversity, would not be regarded as pathology.
  2. We also note that many children who express pronounced and unwavering convictions regarding gender identity, and who have supportive families, do not display any level of distress. Rather, distress occurs when the child feels that their genitals ought to dictate their identity and behaviour.
  3. We note too that, unlike transgender adolescents and adults, gender diverse children below the age of puberty have no need of somatic gender affirming healthcare. These children do not need puberty suppressants, masculinising or feminising hormones, surgery, or indeed medical intervention of any type. They simply need the opportunity and freedom to explore, incorporate and express their gender identity; they need the support and information that enables them to do these things, as well as manage any adverse reactions of others. In our opinion these developmental challenges do not warrant a diagnosis. Furthermore, a diagnosis wrongly signals to the child and their family that there is something wrong or improper with the child.
  4. We note that the WHO Working Group generating the GIC proposal (http://goo.gl/8JiJi2), and the WHO secretariat, have taken a very different diagnostic approach to persons experiencing developmental processes linked to their sexual orientation. There are currently several diagnoses in ICD-10’s Block F66 (for example sexual maturation disorder and egodystonic sexual orientation) that have the effect of pathologising young people exploring same-sex sexual orientation, incorporating their sexual orientation into their sense of self, learning to express their sexual orientation and dealing with adverse reactions from others. To its credit, the Working Group took the view that developmental processes of this sort – exploration, incorporating, expression and reaction-management in regard to sexual orientation – should not be pathologised. The Group recommended that these diagnoses be removed. The ICD-11 beta draft reflects these recommendations. We are perplexed that the Working Group, and WHO secretariat in preparing the ICD-11 beta draft, have not taken the same approach with young gender diverse children, who engage in similar developmental processes, but linked to gender identity.
  5. We note that the Working Group has recommended that healthcare helping young people who experience discrimination on grounds of their sexual orientation can be provided by way of non-pathologising codes in Chapter 21 of ICD-10 entitled Factors Influencing Health Status and Contact with Health Services. These are the so-called Z Codes in Chapter 21 of ICD-10 (currently Q Codes in the ICD-11 Beta Draft, and placed in Chapter 24). Certain Z Codes may be useful in cases where a person is seeking healthcare for reasons associated with stigma and prejudice. We believe a similar Z Code approach should be taken with gender diverse children below the age of puberty (and their caregivers) who require support from the healthcare system.

 

An alternative proposal and call to WHO

  1. We note the proposals that arose out of the Civil Society Expert Working Group (https://goo.gl/O1NrbJ) that met in Buenos Aires in April 2013. The meeting was convened by GATE, an international organization focused on promoting trans people’s human rights, including to health. The proposals (GATE, 2013) [Erratum 20160516. Should read, “(https://goo.gl/wuPMkI)”] are for facilitating healthcare for gender diverse children below the age of puberty through the use of Z Codes – in most cases minor amendments of already existing Z Codes. Such Z codes would detail the nature of the support being offered to these children and to the adults responsible for caring for them. These codes could facilitate children’s (and caregivers’) access to supportive counselling and information services, as well as to medical examinations linked to approaching puberty. These codes could also be used to facilitate children’s access to school in authentic (gender affirmative) roles. Finally, in those few cases in which young gender diverse children experience distress of an extent and nature demanding clinical mental health care, these Z Codes could be used as markers, attached to generic diagnoses such as depression or anxiety, signaling that the child’s mental health issues are linked to experiences of discrimination on grounds of their gender diversity (with implications for the sort of care needed).
  2. We take the view that arguments for the GIC diagnosis – for example that it will provide a foundation for research and training – appear flawed. We do not believe that research or training in relation to childhood gender diversity would suffer if there were no GIC diagnosis in ICD-11. We note that research into same sex attraction and relationships has thrived since homosexuality diagnosis was removed from the diagnostic manuals decades ago. We believe too that knowledge about the healthcare needs of gay and lesbian youth is better now than it was when homosexuality was a diagnosis.
  3. We note too that key transgender health and rights organisations worldwide other than GATE have spoken out against this proposal. They include ILGA (International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex association), ILGA-Europe, STP (Stop Trans Pathologization) and TGEU (Transgender Europe). We note also statements arising out of two international meetings examining transgender health, one in Cape Town, South Africa, and the other in Taipei, Taiwan. Finally, we note that the European Parliament in the so called Ferrara Report published in July 2015 called on the European Commission to “intensify efforts to prevent gender variance in childhood from becoming a new ICD diagnosis”. This call was reaffirmed in a European Parliament Resolution passed in September 2015. We are aware of a recent member survey by WPATH that found that a majority of participants were opposed to the proposed diagnosis, with this majority much greater among members outside the USA.

– GATE (https://goo.gl/wuPMkI)
– ILGA (http://ilga.org/)
– ILGA-Europe (http://goo.gl/Z1k636)
– STP (http://goo.gl/oERkcm)
– TGEU (Transgender Europe, http://goo.gl/KRJLlI)
– Cape Town, South Africa (http://goo.gl/vIMwYH)
– Taipei, Taiwan (http://goo.gl/cW4Jxf)
– European Parliament Resolution (http://goo.gl/rBAJRA)
– Member survey by WPATH (http://goo.gl/mAVmgu)

Taking into account all the above, we the undersigned, a group of scholars, researchers and clinicians working in transgender health and rights, call on WHO to abandon the proposed GIC diagnosis and incorporate the use of Z Codes as a means of facilitating and guiding support for gender diverse children below the age of puberty. We commend to WHO the GATE Civil Society Expert Working Group proposal (https://goo.gl/NfdDmg).

Original Signatories

Sam Winter, BSc, PGDE, M.Ed., PhD
Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
Discipline: Psychologist.
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 16.
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 14 years.
Clinical services for gender diverse children: Yes.

Elizabeth Riley BSc, GDCouns, MA(Couns), PhD
Counsellor, Clinical & PhD Supervisor, Trainer, Sydney, Australia
Disciplines: Health Sciences & Counselling
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 18
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 20 years.
Clinical services for gender diverse children: Yes

Simon Pickstone-Taylor, MBChB
Honorary Senior Lecturer, Gender Identity Development Service, Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Cape Town, South Africa.
Discipline: Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist and General Adult Psychiatrist.
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 13.
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 13 years.
Clinical services for gender diverse children: Yes.

Amets Suess, PhD, MA, BA
Researcher, Area of International Health, Andalusian School of Public Health, Granada, Spain
Discipline: Sociology, Social Anthropology, Art Therapy, Bioethics
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 14

Kelley Winters, Ph.D.
Gender Diversity Medical Policy Analyst; author, Gender Madness in American Psychiatry: Essays from the Struggle for Dignity (2008)
Discipline: Interdisciplinary scholarship.
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 21.

Lisa Griffin, Ph.D.
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, United States.
Discipline: Psychologist.
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 21.
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 21.
Clinical services for gender diverse children: Yes.

Diane Ehrensaft, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco
Discipline: Developmental and Clinical Psychologist
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 25
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 30 years.
Clinical services for gender diverse children: Yes.

Darlene Tando, LCSW
Gender Therapist, Private Practice
San Diego, California
United States
Discipline: Licensed Clinical Social Worker
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 10
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 10
Clinical services for gender diverse children: Yes.

Hershel Russell M.Ed, (Couns. Psych)
Registered Psychotherapist,Counsellor, Clinical Supervisor, Trainer, Toronto, Canada
Discipline: Psychotherapist.
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 15.
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 20 years.

Brenda R. Alegre,PhD.
Registered Psychologist and Psychometrician
Assistant Lecturer Faculty of Arts, University of Hong Kong SAR, China
Discipline: Clinical Psychology
Years working in the field of transgender health and rights: 10+ years
Clinical Services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 10+ years
Clinical services for gender diverse children: yes

Griet De Cuypere, M.D. Ph.D.
Former Head of the Gender Team Gent, Belgium
Discipline: Psychiatrist – psychotherapist.
Years working in field of transgender health and rights: 30.
Clinical services offered for transgender people: Yes
Years doing this sort of work: 30 years.

 

Sign the Letter:

For signing the letter please go to: www.gicrevisited.org

To view current signatories in spreadsheet form, see https://goo.gl/yqta4Q
(Ver Traducción española por debajo)

 

El Diagnóstico “Incongruencia de Género en la Infancia” revisado: una declaración de profesionales de la salud e investigador*s.

[translation appended 20160516]

07 de mayo de 2016

Translation: Karen Bennett
Revision: Amets Suess ​
Esta es una carta abierta a la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS), una agencia de las Naciones Unidas, de investigador*s y profesionales de la salud que trabajan en salud y derechos trans, con respecto a las revisiones propuestas para la Clasificación Estadística Internacional de Enfermedades y Problemas de Salud Relacionados, versión 11 (CIE -11), que se relacionan con la asistencia médica para adult*s y adolescentes trans, como también para niñ*s de género diverso (GD).

Felicitamos a la OMS por las revisiones propuestas, que moverían las categorías diagnósticas relacionadas con los procesos de transición de género (actualmente “F64 Trastornos de identidad de género” de la CIE-10) desde el capítulo de “Trastornos mentales y del comportamiento”, a un nuevo capítulo sobre “Condiciones vinculadas a la salud sexual”. También damos la bienvenida a la propuesta de eliminar completamente “F65.1. Travestismo fetichista” y “F66. Trastornos psicológicos y del comportamiento asociados con el desarrollo y la orientación sexual” de la CIE-11. Sin embargo, estamos preocupad*s por el diagnóstico propuesto de “Incongruencia de Género en la Infancia” (IGI) y hacemos un llamamiento a la OMS para que reconsidere dicha inclusión. En lugar de ello, instamos a la consideración de propuestas menos estigmatizantes elaboradas por el Grupo de Trabajo de Expert*s de la Sociedad Civil de GATE, y otr*s expert*s mundiales para facilitar el acceso a apoyo psicológico a niñ*s de género diverso.

Para añadir tu nombre y tu voz a esta carta, por favor completa el formulario en la parte inferior. Podrás ver las otras firmas después de haber firmado. Para consultas acerca de esta carta abierta, puedes contactar con Sam Winter <sjwinter@hku.hk>. Para consultas sobre este formulario Web, contacta con Kelley Winters<kelley@wintersgap.net>.
Comentarios generales sobre las propuestas de la CIE relacionados con la expresión e identidad de género
=====================================================================

  1. Seguimos con interés el progreso del proceso de revisión de la CIE. Esperamos ver la publicación de la CIE-11, que estamos confiad*s se mantendrá, al igual que la CIE-10 (http://goo.gl/MlUnk8),el manual de diagnóstico principal utilizado en todo el mundo.
  2. A partir del Borrador Beta de la CIE-11 (http://goo.gl/tOhj9R), vigente al momento del escrito, apuntamos una serie de revisiones pertinentes a la prestación de asistencia sanitaria para las personas trans, definid*s aquí como aquell*s individuos que se identifican con un género distinto al sexo que les fuera asignado al nacer .
  3. Apoyamos la propuesta de abandonar el diagnóstico de “Travestismo fetichista” (F65.1) y todos los diagnósticos de los trastornos en el bloque titulado “Trastornos de preferencia sexual” (Bloque F66). Estamos de acuerdo en que estos diagnósticos son problemáticos, ya que no tienen utilidad clínica, no sirven para ninguna necesidad creíble de salud pública, refuerzan estereotipos difamatorios, y son potencialmente perjudiciales para la salud y el bienestar de las personas diagnosticadas.
  4. Apoyamos la propuesta de eliminar del capítulo “Trastornos Mentales y del comportamiento” los diagnósticos más comúnmente usados para facilitar la asistencia médica de reafirmación de género para personas trans, y ubicarlas en su lugar en un capítulo llamado “Condiciones relacionadas con la salud sexual”.
  5. Creemos que la propuesta de la colocación de un nuevo capítulo está en línea con el entendimiento clínico contemporáneo, reafirmado por asociaciones profesionales tales como WPATH (Asociación Profesional Mundial de la Salud Trans, (http://goo.gl/89zAwa), que la conceptualización de las identidades de género de las personas trans como psicopatológicas no es apropiada. Observamos que la perspectiva psicopatologizante no coincide con (y de hecho ha socavado a veces) la provisión de una asistencia sanitaria efectiva de reafirmación de género, utilizada en el momento actual para apoyar a las personas trans con necesidades de atención sanitaria. De hecho, ha contribuido a intentos potencialmente dañinos dirigidos a modificar sus identidades de género. Los Estándares de Cuidado Versión 7 de WPATH (http://goo.gl/rven2O) señalan que estos enfoques no son éticos. Creemos también que la perspectiva psicopatologizante ha aumentado innecesariamente el estigma que sufren las personas trans, lo cual socava el derecho al reconocimiento legal de género.
  6. Apoyamos el abandono del término trastorno de identidad de género, actualmente utilizado como un concepto paraguas para el bloque de diagnósticos (F64) más comúnmente utilizados para facilitar la atención sanitaria de reafirmación de género para personas trans. Vemos la propuesta del término sustituto, incongruencia de género, como un intento de reducir el lenguaje excesivamente patologizante inherente al concepto de trastorno de identidad género. Sin embargo, observamos que el concepto de incongruencia de género no es universalmente apoyado dentro de las comunidades trans. Ver los últimos comunicados de prensa por STP (Campaña International Stop Trans Patologización, http://goo.gl/0GRvA6), y GATE (Global Action for Trans* Equality, http://goo.gl/GHpzog), esta última en asociación con STP.
  7. Observamos que en la actualidad hay dos propuestas de diagnósticos de incongruencia de género, uno para adolescentes / adult*s y otra para niñ*s pre púberes. Observamos con aprobación el lenguaje en las descripciones de estos diagnósticos que evita el pensamiento binario, y es más inclusivo con la diversidad de las identidades de género de las personas.
  8. Observamos que otros aspectos de la redacción de las descripciones de diagnóstico han atraído críticas. Sin embargo, nos centramos en los siguientes apartados en la propuesta de diagnóstico de incongruencia de género en la infancia (IGI) .

Preocupaciones específicas sobre la propuesta de diagnóstico de incongruencia de género en la infancia
=====================================================================

  1. En primer lugar, observamos con preocupación que, independientemente del lugar en el cual se sitúe la propuesta de diagnóstico IGI en la CIE-11, éste patologiza las experiencias de niñ*s debajo de la edad de pubertad que están o bien explorando su identidad, o están incorporando su identidad de género en un sentido más amplio de quiénes son, sintiéndose cada vez más cómod*s expresando dicha identidad y el manejo de reacciones adversas de l*s demás. Observamos que en varias culturas en todo el mundo, estas experiencias que aquí denominamos diversidad de género, no se considerarían como patología.
  2. Observamos también que much*s niñ*s que expresan convicciones pronunciadas e inquebrantables con respecto a su identidad de género, y que tienen familias que l*s apoyan, no muestran nivel de angustia alguno. Por el contrario, la angustia se produce cuando el* niñ* siente que sus genitales deben dictar su identidad y comportamiento.
  3. Observamos también que, a diferencia de adolescentes y adult*s trans, l*s niños de género diverso pre púberes no tienen necesidad de asistencia sanitaria somática de reafirmación de género. Est*s niñ*s no necesitan supresores de pubertad, ni hormonas de masculinización o feminización, ni cirugías o, de hecho, intervención médica de algún tipo. Simplemente necesitan la oportunidad y la libertad para explorar, incorporar y expresar su identidad de género; necesitan el apoyo y la información que les permita hacer estas cosas, así como manejar las reacciones adversas de l*s demás. En nuestra opinión, estos desafíos de desarrollo no justifican un diagnóstico. Por otra parte, el diagnóstico indica erróneamente al* niñ* y su familia que hay algo incorrecto o inapropiado con el* niñ*.
  4. Observamos que el Grupo de Trabajo de la OMS generador de la propuesta IGI (http://goo.gl/8JiJi2), y la Secretaría de la OMS, han tomado enfoques de diagnóstico muy diferentes para personas que experimentan procesos de desarrollo vinculados a su orientación sexual. Actualmente existen varios diagnósticos en el bloque F66 de la CIE-10 (por ejemplo: trastornos de la maduración sexual y orientación sexual egodistónica) que tienen el efecto de patologizar a jóvenes que exploran la orientación sexual hacia el mismo sexo, incorporando su orientación sexual dentro su percepción de sí mism*s, aprendiendo a expresar su orientación sexual y el manejo de las reacciones adversas de l*s demás. A su favor, el Grupo de Trabajo consideró que los procesos de desarrollo de este tipo – la exploración, la incorporación, la expresión y el manejo de la reacción con respecto a la orientación sexual – no deben ser patologizados. El Grupo recomendó que se eliminen estos diagnósticos. El Borrador Beta de la CIE-11 refleja estas recomendaciones. Estamos perplej*s que en la preparación del Borrador Beta de la CIE11, el Grupo de Trabajo y la Secretaría de la OMS, no han tenido el mismo enfoque con niñ*s de género diverso, que se inscriben en procesos de desarrollo similares, pero vinculados a la identidad de género.
  5. Observamos que el Grupo de Trabajo ha recomendado que la asistencia sanitaria que ayuda a jóvenes que padecen discriminación motivada por su orientación sexual, puede ser proporcionada a través de los códigos no patologizantes en el capítulo 21 de la CIE-10, titulados “Factores que influyen en el Estado de Salud y el Contacto con Servicios de Salud”. Estos son los llamados códigos Z en el capítulo 21 de la CIE-10 (actualmente códigos Q en el Borrador Beta de CIE-11, y colocados en el Capítulo 24). Ciertos códigos Z pueden ser útiles en los casos en los cuales una persona busque atención sanitaria por razones asociadas al estigma y los prejuicios. Creemos que un enfoque similar de Código Z debe ser tomado para niñ*s de género diverso pre púberes (y sus tutor*s) que requieren del apoyo del sistema de salud.

Una propuesta alternativa y un llamamiento a la OMS
===========================================

  1. Tomamos nota de las propuestas que surgieron del Grupo de Trabajo de Expert*s de Sociedad Civil (https://goo.gl/O1NrbJ) que se reunió en Buenos Aires en abril de 2013. El encuentro fue convocado por GATE, una organización internacional centrada en la promoción de los derechos humanos de las personas trans, incluyendo la salud. Las propuestas (GATE, 2013) son para facilitar la atención sanitaria para niñ*s pre púberes de género diverso mediante el uso de códigos Z – en la mayoría de los casos, modificaciones menores de códigos Z ya existentes. Tales códigos Z detallarían la naturaleza de la ayuda que se ofrece a est*s niñ*s y a l*s adult*s responsables de cuidar de ell*s. Estos códigos podrían facilitar el acceso de l*s niños (y sus tutor*s) a servicios afirmativos de asesoramiento e información, así como a los exámenes médicos vinculados a abordar la pubertad. Estos códigos también podrían utilizarse para facilitar el acceso de l*s niñ*s a la escuela en roles auténticos (de reafirmación de género). Por último, en los pocos casos en los que l*s niñ*s de género diverso que experimenten angustia de alcance y naturaleza que requieran atención clínia de salud mental, estos códigos Z podrían ser utilizados como marcadores, adjuntos a diagnósticos genéricos tales como la depresión o la ansiedad, señalando que las cuestiones de salud mental del* niñ* están vinculadas a las experiencias de discriminación fundadas en su diversidad de género (con implicaciones para el tipo de cuidado requerido).
  2. Somos de la opinión de que los argumentos para el diagnóstico IGI – por ejemplo, que proporcionará una base para la investigación y la formación – parecen fallidos. No creemos que la investigación o formación relacionadas con la diversidad de género en la infancia sufran por la inexistencia de un diagnóstico IGI en la CIE-11. Observamos que la investigación sobre atracciones y relaciones entre el mismo sexo ha prosperado desde que el diagnóstico de homosexualidad fue retirado de los manuales de diagnóstico hace décadas. Creemos también que el conocimiento sobre las necesidades de asistencia sanitaria de jóvenes homosexuales y lesbianas es mejor ahora de lo que era cuando la homosexualidad era un diagnóstico.
  3. Observamos también que organizaciones clave en salud y derechos trans en todo el mundo aparte de GATE, se han manifestado en contra de esta propuesta. Éstas incluyen a ILGA (Asociación Internacional Lesbiana, Gay, Bisexual, Trans e Intersex), ILGA-Europa, STP (Campaña Internacional Stop Trans Pathologization) y TGEU (Transgender Europe). También tomamos nota de las declaraciones surgidas de dos encuentros internacionales que examinaron la salud trans, uno en Ciudad del Cabo, Sudáfrica, y el otro en Taipéi, Taiwán. Por último, observamos que el Parlamento Europeo en el así llamado Informe Ferrara publicado en julio de 2015 pidió a la Comisión Europea de “intensificar los esfuerzos para evitar que la diversidad de género en la infancia se convierta en un nuevo diagnóstico de la CIE”. Este llamamiento se reafirmó en una Resolución del Parlamento Europeo aprobada en septiembre de 2015. Somos conscientes de una encuesta reciente de miembros de WPATH, que mostró que la mayoría de participantes se opuso al diagnóstico propuesto, siendo esta mayoría mucho mayor entre miembros fuera de los EE.UU.

– GATE (https://goo.gl/wuPMkI)
– ILGA (http://ilga.org/)
– ILGA-Europe (http://goo.gl/Z1k636)
– STP (http://goo.gl/oERkcm)
– TGEU (Transgender Europe, http://goo.gl/KRJLlI)
– Ciudad del Cabo, Sudáfrica (http://goo.gl/vIMwYH)
– Taipei, Taiwan (http://goo.gl/cW4Jxf)
– Resolución del Parlamento Europeo (http://goo.gl/rBAJRA)
– Encuesta de Miembros de WPATH (http://goo.gl/mAVmgu)
En virtud de lo arriba expresado, l*s abajo firmantes, un grupo de académic*s, investigador*s y profesionales de la salud que trabajan en salud y derechos trans, llaman a la OMS a abandonar la propuesta de diagnóstico IGI, e incorporar el uso de códigos Z como un medio para facilitar y asistir en el apoyo a niñ*s pre púberes de género diverso. Encomendamos a la OMS la propuesta de Grupo de Trabajo de Expert*s de Sociedad Civil de GATE (https://goo.gl/NfdDmg)
Firmar la Carta Abierta Encima: [Translation appended 20160630]
=========================

Para ver las firmas actuales en formato de hoja de cálculo, véase: https://goo.gl/yqta4Q
Tu nombre y apellidos, títulos (Dr. / Dra., MA, MD, etc.):*
(Your name, titles/degrees {PhD, M.Soc.Sci., MD…})

Institución / organización en la que trabajas / afiliación (si procede):
(Institution/Organization of employment/affiliation {if any})

País:*
(Country)

Disciplina profesional:*
(Professional discipline)

Número de años trabajando en el ámbito de la salud y/o de los derechos trans:*
(Number of years of clinical services to transgender people)

¿Trabajas en la atención sanitaria dirigida a personas trans?*
(You provide(d) clinical services to transgender

people?)

Sí: (Yes)
No: (No)

Número de años de experiencia profesional en la atención sanitaria a personas trans:
(Number of years working in field of trans health and/or rights)

¿Trabajas en la atención sanitaria dirigida a niñ*s divers*s en el género?*
(You provide(d) clinical services to gender diverse children?)

Sí: (Yes)
No: (No)

Comentarios (si procede):
(Your comments {if any})

Errata [list added 20160516]

Intro, para. 3: [Erratum 20150516. Should read, “You will be prompted to view other signatories after you submit your response, or follow the link in the signature section.”]

Item #3: [Erratum 20150516. Should read, “Psychological and behavioural disorders associated with sexual development and orientation (Block F66).”]

Item #14: [Erratum 20160516. Should read, “(https://goo.gl/wuPMkI)”]